Democracy in Hong Kong

 Monitoring Hong Kong’s basic freedoms, the rule of law and autonomy as promised under the ‘one country, two systems’ principle which is enshrined in the Basic Law and the Sino-British Joint Declaration. 

How you can help

Contact your government representatives and ask them to sign this joint statement led by the former Governor of Hong Kong, Lord Patten, and the former UK Foreign Secretary, Sir Malcolm Rifkind, expressing “grave concern” over the “unilateral introduction of national security legislation in Hong Kong.”

More information about the 200+ signatories.

Contact your representatives:

Use the Alliance Canada Hong Kong’s online tool to send a letter to your representatives requesting sanctions against involved officials, support for asylum seekeres, protection for Canadians, investigations into foreign influence and an export ban on military technology (see Canada’s Five Demands).

Alternately, find the contact details for your current MPs here and write your own letter of concern and support.

Sign this petition:

Call your representatives (find their number on GovTrack):

Contact your representatives (WriteToThem helps you look who yours is):

Alternately, use Stand with HK to send an pre-written email to your MP that asks them to uphold the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration.

Also, donate to Hong Kong Watch, “a UK-based registered charity which researches and monitors threats to Hong Kong’s basic freedoms, the rule of law and autonomy as promised under the ‘one country, two systems’ principle…”

Contact your legislator (find them using this or this website):

  • Tell them you are very concerned about the situation in Hong Kong.
  • Urge them to make a statement that they will protect Hong Kong’s political offenders and protesters.

(Taiwan information via chihao & co.).

Contact the EDA or Ignazio Cassius, or your representatives in the National Council or Council of States:

  • Tell them you are very concerned about the situation in Hong Kong.
  • Urge them to make a statement in support of the protesters in Hong Kong and against the excessive police violence there.

Contact members of the parliament to express concern about and solidarity with the protesters of Hong Kong:

Post a petition to the Blue House.

Contact politicians to express your concerns and ask for support and solidarity. Ask for political support from the government for the protests in the form of a motion:

Donate to groups that are supporting protestors on the ground (both groups’ PayPal accounts are not working at the moment):

Donate to these legislator-backed crowdfunding campaigns:

  • Sue the Abuser – helping victims sue the police over alleged mistreatment.

Donate to groups supporting journalists on the ground:

  • Radical HK 基進報導 (on top of being a news organization, they provide sign language interpretation at many events)

Donate to these non-profit, independent news organizations so they can continue to provide coverage of Hong Kong:

Donate to these civil society research organizations:

Pitch in for supplies that protect people during police operations:

  • Persuade your organization to sign this letter urging the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women “to examine gender-based violence committed by the Hong Kong Police Force.”
  • If you’re part of a community group, association or organization, publish a statement in support of the protestors. If possible, band together with other groups to sign a joint statement.
  • Hold discussions within your diaspora communities, with folks who are on the fence or self-identified centrists. But approach with caution if folks are already staunchly against the protests.